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USA Today reports that the Obama administration is reporting that Colombia is no longer the world’s largest producer of the pain narcotic – cocaine.

Cocaine is a powerful nervous system stimulant which increases alertness, feelings of well-being and euphoria, energy and motor activity, feelings of competence and sexuality. Athletic performance may be enhanced in sports where sustained attention and endurance is required. Anxiety, paranoia and restlessness are also frequent. With excessive dosage, tremors, convulsions and increased body temperature are observed.

For many years the country of Colombia has been synonymous to cocaine and stereotyped throughout the media, film, music and entertainment industries.

Gil Kerlikowske, director of the White House Office on National Drug Control Policy, announced Monday that Colombia — the origin of much of the cocaine trafficked into the U.S.— fell behind Peru and Bolivia in production of cocaine in 2011. The latest estimate puts Colombia’s production at 195 metric tons, a 25% reduction from the previous year and down from 700 metric tons in 2001.

However, that announcement contradicts a study put out by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime which showed increase in Colombian cocaine production by 3%. Kerlikowske stood by their findings stating that their findings are supported “by more sophisticated technology and a different methodology”.

It’d be nice to know that the production and distribution of highly addictive and illegal drugs like cocaine are decreasing. The two conflicting reports make it hard to know which one to trust. How does that affect drug addiction in the United States if it really has increased the 3% that the U.N is reporting? Or if it’s down by 25% according to the U.S report?

We might not have all the answers now but it’s great to see it as a forefront in the media. Beating drug addiction is serious business and beating a cocaine addiction is even tougher, but not impossible.

If you or someone you know is trying to beat cocaine addiction, call us at (877) 711-HOPE (4673) or visit us online at www.palmpartners.com.

 

 

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